Category Archive : Environnement

[Action requise] Votre essai RSS.app a expiré – Sam 24 octobre 2020

quote

J’ai essayé plusieurs générateurs de flux RSS et celui qui fonctionnait le mieux, en plus d’être le plus simple, était RSS.app. C’est formidable à quel point l’outil peut être utile pour quelqu’un qui ne sait pas coder. ( IFTTT, Zapier, etc.), c’est le premier qui est très simple et qui fonctionne hors de la boîte.

Isaac Halvorson iOS developer

Isaac Halvorson

Développeur iOS hisaac

[Action requise] Votre essai RSS.app a expiré – ven 23 octobre 2020

quote

J’ai essayé plusieurs générateurs de flux RSS et celui qui fonctionnait le mieux, en plus d’être le plus simple, était RSS.app. C’est formidable à quel point l’outil peut être utile pour quelqu’un qui ne sait pas coder. ( IFTTT, Zapier, etc.), c’est le premier qui est complètement simple et qui fonctionne hors de la boîte.

Isaac Halvorson iOS developer

Isaac Halvorson

Développeur iOS hisaac

[Action requise] Votre essai RSS.app a expiré – Jeu 22 octobre 2020

quote

J’ai essayé plusieurs générateurs de flux RSS et celui qui fonctionnait le mieux, en plus d’être le plus simple, était RSS.app. C’est formidable à quel point l’outil peut être utile pour quelqu’un qui ne sait pas coder. ( IFTTT, Zapier, etc.), c’est le premier qui est complètement simple et qui fonctionne hors de la boîte.

Isaac Halvorson iOS developer

Isaac Halvorson

Développeur iOS hisaac

[Action requise] Votre essai RSS.app est arrivé à expiration – Mar 20 octobre 2020

quote

J’ai essayé plusieurs générateurs de flux RSS et celui qui fonctionnait le mieux, en plus d’être le plus simple, était RSS.app. C’est formidable à quel point l’outil peut être utile pour quelqu’un qui ne sait pas coder. ( IFTTT, Zapier, etc.), c’est le premier qui est complètement simple et qui fonctionne hors de la boîte.

Isaac Halvorson iOS developer

Isaac Halvorson

Développeur iOS hisaac

[Action requise] Votre essai RSS.app a expiré – Lun 19 octobre 2020

quote

J’ai essayé plusieurs générateurs de flux RSS et celui qui fonctionnait le mieux, en plus d’être le plus simple, était RSS.app. C’est formidable à quel point l’outil peut être utile pour quelqu’un qui ne sait pas coder. ( IFTTT, Zapier, etc.), c’est le premier qui est complètement simple et qui fonctionne hors de la boîte.

Isaac Halvorson iOS developer

Isaac Halvorson

Développeur iOS hisaac

[Action requise] Votre essai RSS.app a expiré – Dim 18 octobre 2020

quote

J’ai essayé plusieurs générateurs de flux RSS et celui qui fonctionnait le mieux, en plus d’être le plus simple, était RSS.app. C’est formidable à quel point l’outil peut être utile pour quelqu’un qui ne sait pas coder. ( IFTTT, Zapier, etc.), c’est le premier qui est complètement simple et qui fonctionne hors de la boîte.

Isaac Halvorson iOS developer

Isaac Halvorson

Développeur iOS hisaac

Forecasters say drought more likely than blizzards this winter

Don’t expect much of a winter wallop this year, except for the pain of worsening drought, U.S. government forecasters said Thursday.

Two-thirds of the United States should get a warmer than normal winter, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicted. Only Washington, northern Idaho, Montana, the Dakotas and northwestern Minnesota, will get a colder than normal winter, forecasters said.

The forecast for winter rain and snow splits the nation in three stripes. NOAA sees the entire south from southern California to North Carolina getting a dry winter. Forecasters see wetter weather for the northernmost states: Oregon and Washington to Michigan and dipping down to Illinois, Indiana, Ohio and other parts of the Ohio Valley. The rest of the nation will likely be closer to normal, NOAA said.

For the already dry Southwest and areas across the South, this could be a “big punch,” said NOAA drought expert David Miskus. About 45 percent of the nation is in drought, the highest level in more than seven years.

Mike Halpert, deputy director of NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center, said he doesn’t see much relief for central and southern California, where wildfires have been raging.

What’s driving the mostly warmer and drier winter forecast is La Nina, the cooling of parts of the central Pacific that alter weather patterns worldwide, Halpert said.

For the East, big snowstorms or blizzards aren’t usually associated with La Nina. That’s more likely with its warming ocean counterpart, El Nino, he said. But he added that extreme events are not something meteorologists can see in seasonal forecasts.

Halpert also said he doesn’t expect the dreaded polar vortex to be much of a factor this year, except maybe in the Northern Plains and Great Lakes.

The vortex is the gigantic circular upper-air pattern that pens the cold close to the North Pole. When it weakens, the cold wanders away from the pole and brings bone-chilling weather to northern and eastern parts of the U.S.

While Halpert doesn’t see that happening much this winter, an expert in the polar vortex does.

Judah Cohen, a winter weather specialist for the private firm Atmospheric Environmental Research, sees a harsher winter for the Northeast than NOAA does. He bases much of his forecasting on what’s been happening in the Arctic and Siberian snow cover in October. His research shows that the more snow on the ground in Siberia in October, the harsher the winter in the eastern United States as the polar vortex weakens and wanders south.

Snow cover in Siberia was low in early October, but it is catching up fast and looks to be heavier than normal by the end of the month, he said.

The government predictions are about increased or decreased odds in what the entire three months of weather look like, not an individual day or storm, so don’t plan any event on a seasonal outlook, cautioned Greg Postel, a storm specialist at The Weather Channel. But he said La Nina is the strongest indicator among several for what drives winter weather. La Nina does bring a milder than average winter to the southeast, but it also makes the central U.S. “susceptible to Arctic blasts,” he said.

La Nina also dominates the forecast by AccuWeather. That private company is forecasting mainly dry in the South, wet and snowy in the Pacific Northwest, bouts of snow and rain from Minneapolis through the Great Lakes region, big swings in the heartland and mild weather in the mid-Atlantic. The company predicts a few heavy snow events in the Midwest and Great Lakes, but less than average snow for the Northeast.

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

A La Niña winter is on the way for the US

The global average temperature for September was a new record.
Enlarge / The global average temperature for September was a new record.

September apparently wasn’t feeling like doing anything unusual, so it ended up being the warmest September on record for the globe. That’s been something of a trend this year, with each month landing in its respective top three. It has become increasingly clear that 2020 will likely be the second warmest year on record, if it isn’t the first.

Unlike in August, the contiguous US didn’t set a record in September, though it was still above the 20th century average. A high-pressure ridge dominated over the West Coast again, leading to even more warm and dry weather for much of the Western US. But a trough set up over the Central US in mid-September, bringing cooler air southward.

Two more hurricanes—Sally and Beta—led to above-average rainfall in the Southeast. Total precipitation for the contiguous US was a touch above average as a result, but the average as usual masks local differences. Drought conditions have expanded and worsened over much of the West, and there has been little relief for wildfire conditions.

Speaking of those hurricanes, they brought the number of named storms making landfall in the contiguous US to nine for the year. That tied 1916 for the most on record, but Hurricane Delta’s landfall in Louisiana has since added to 2020’s dizzying tally.

September also saw the number of billion-dollar-plus disasters in the US climb to 16—tying 2011 and 2017 for the most in a year since the start of this (inflation-adjusted) metric in 1980.

What next?

NOAA released its winter outlook on Thursday. These long-range outlooks are based on a combination of observed trends, important slow-changing patterns, and model simulations. NOAA typically discusses the next-month and next-three-months outlook, but this round includes the December-January-February seasonal window.

If you caught last month’s update, this will look pretty familiar. The biggest factor in play is the La Niña conditions in the Pacific Ocean, which are likely to persist at least until spring. La Niñas tend to have a pretty defined impact on US winter weather, though the variability of weather doesn’t disappear. But the cold surface temperatures in the eastern equatorial Pacific generally promote a shift in the US storm track that leads to more cold and wet weather across the northern tier of the country, with warmer and drier weather across the south.

Why we don’t know exactly what happened during a near-collision in space

LeoLabs, which uses its own ground-based radars to track spaceborne objects, put the odds of collision at 10% or greater. That’s high, but not uncommon, LeoLabs CEO Daniel Ceperley told CNN Business on Thursday.

But the US military, which uses data from the world’s largest network of radars and telescopes, said that its space traffic control team detected a “nearly zero percent probability of collision.”

In response, LeoLabs’s Ceperley said in a statement Friday morning: “We obviously have a great deal of respect for the [US military’s] 18th Space Control Squadron and their estimates. Nobody is disputing that these objects came close to one another.”

Meanwhile, Moriba Jah, an astrodynamicist at the University of Texas at Austin who has long been trying to raise public awareness about the abundance of junk in Earth’s orbit at constant risk of colliding, said the ordeal was only the latest piece of evidence that the world needs an internationally collaborative effort to track space traffic.

His data, an amalgamation of all publicly available real-time space traffic information, show dozens of potential collisions happening at any given moment. Jah suggested the Soviet satellite and discarded rocket booster were expected to come within 72 meters of each other. However, he couldn’t say for sure whether a collision was even “likely.”

Objects in space are tracked with telescopes and radar operated by governments and private companies. But all those organizations around the globe are hesitant to share their data with each other. So, when there is a chance that two things in space might collide, experts have an extremely difficult time hashing out exactly how high the risks are. LeoLabs does not share its data publicly.

Ceperley told CNN Business Thursday that the company decided to raise public awareness about this particular event because the two objects are both large, and because they’re in an area of orbit that’s still relatively clean compared to nearby orbits. The company is also trying to raise more general awareness about the debris problem, he said, to encourage the private sector to develop means of cleaning it up.

“Multiple times a week we’re seeing dead satellites come within 100 meters of each other, moving at tremendous speeds,” Ceperley said.

What happened Thursday

The Soviet satellite, which launched to space in 1989 and was used for navigation, weighs nearly 2,000 pounds and is 55 feet long, according to Jonathan McDowell, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The rocket booster, part of a Chinese Long March launch vehicle that likely launched in 2009, is about 20 feet long. Neither of the objects are still in use.

If the rocket and satellite did collide, it would have been the first time in more than a decade that two objects spontaneously collided in space — a situation space traffic experts have hoped desperately to avoid.

The last collision, in 2009, saw a dead Russian military satellite ram into an active communications satellite operated by US-based telecommunications firm Iridium. That event produced a massive cloud of debris, most of which is too small to track from the ground. And the wreckage is still in orbit, posing a constant threat to nearby satellites.

There are also already hundreds of thousands — possibly millions — of objects whirling around in orbit uncontrolled, including tiny pieces of debris, spent rocket boosters, dead satellites and detritus from military anti-satellite missile demonstrations. The junk is heavily concentrated in areas of orbit closest to the Earth’s surface. And, though it doesn’t pose much of a risk to humans on the ground, it does threaten hoards of active satellites that provide all sorts of services, including tracking the weather, studying the Earth’s climate, and providing telecom services. The debris also threatens the International Space Station, where crews of astronauts have lived since 2000, and which has had to adjust its own orbit three times this year due to space debris.
Space is becoming too crowded, Rocket Lab CEO warns

McDowell explained on Twitter that a new collision would be “very bad.” The Soviet satellite and Chinese rocket booster could have led to a 10% to 20% increase in the amount of debris in space, and each new piece of debris boosts the odds that more collisions will keep happening.

It could even set off a disastrous chain reaction, leaving space littered with an impenetrable field of garbage that brings new rocket launches and space exploration to a grinding halt.

Part of the problem is that outer space remains largely unregulated. The last widely agreed-upon international treaty guiding the use of outer space hasn’t been updated in five decades, which has mostly left the space industry to police itself.

The rise in popularity of megaconstellations — epitomized by the Starlink internet constellation that Elon Musk’s SpaceX is building — has sparked a new wave of discussion about the risks of congestion in orbit. Rocket Lab CEO Peter Beck told CNN Business last month that growing congestion in space is already making it more difficult for his company’s rockets to find a clear path to orbit to deliver new satellites.

Snow lovers hope La Niña delivers on cooler, wetter winter across western Washington

A man skis on a road in the Ballard neighborhood after a large storm blanketed the city with snow on February 9, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. Seattle almost reached its yearly amount of snowfall in a day. (Photo by David Ryder/Getty Images)

Western Washington is likely to experience a cooler, wetter winter this year because of a La Niña weather pattern, according to new long-term projections from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

While more precipitation and cooler temperatures are the perfect conditions for snow, NOAA says it can’t project seasonal snowfall accumulations that far in advance. Snow forecasts are usually not predictable more than a week out, it explains in the new data.

That doesn’t mean we can’t dream about it, or cross our fingers and hope instead for a heat wave. The National Weather Service issued a poll on Twitter on Thursday asking Pacific Northwesterners how they feel about snow this winter.

Just over 2,000 people voted and 56.5% said they want a ton of snow, with another 25.4% voting for just a bit of snow. That leaves 18% hoping for the more typical clouds and rain, and maybe some sun breaks this season.

For now, if you’re a snow lover, you’re likely already paying close attention to what’s happening in the Cascade Mountains. Snow began falling in earnest at Stevens Pass last weekend, with another hit on Wednesday.

Stevens Pass plans to open on Dec. 4 this season, with some safety precautions. CEO of Vail Resorts, Rob Katz, outlined those precautions here. They include mandatory face coverings and reservations, in order to maintain the proper capacity to ensure good physical distancing.

Snoqualmie Pass is also resuming operations this season, but it’s unclear when. It had to pause its seasons pass sales in September to re-evaluate volume. The resorts plans to resume those sales sometime in October. Meanwhile, it has also published a list of COVID-19 precautions here, which also includes mandatory face coverings.

NOAA’s next winter outlook will post on November 19, 2020. For a full explanation of the entire United States’ climate outlook, NOAA has posted this handy video: